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Pakistani Arabic

Reader comment on item: A Christian Boom
in response to reader comment: Our dear Ridwan aka Radwan

Submitted by ridwan (Australia), Aug 24, 2007 at 04:36

What do you mean? When a word ends with Dhamma the definite article after must start with ul, like Khalil-Ul-Lah, there. And what are you talking about tabligee Arabic? I have heard of Tabligees, and i just researched about them, Tabligees actually came from those Sahabis that came to them, such as Turkey or The Northern Part of Bangladesh, they didnt say that Islam was only for Arabs, they would only abide by Quran, they went there to preach Islam. If Islam was only for Arabs, they would not have been there to preach, would they?

Haven't you read Riyadh-Us-Saliheen, or Sahih-Bukhari, Sahih-Muslim, these guys wouldnt write no bogus Ahadith, they used to see the characteristics of the person they learned from, they would watch his actions very carefully. If his character was good, theres no way in the world that he would be lying, such sensible people weren't liars and it shows a lot more than 100,000 hadith in these books, and you know that such Ahadith arent fake as they were narrated by particular Sahabah.

But the thing is, he almost never slept, if you read his life, he would sleep mostly after Dhuhr after eating and would pray the whole night. And he was no warring, plundering and killing the whole time as you say.

COULD IT BE COULD IT BE, he wasnt. If you read his life, he quit being a merchant after becoming a prophet. So it cannot be true.

And Arabic is a rich and diverse language, there are many meanings for one word, thats why you may have interpreted it wrong, if you read how the much more knowledgable 'Alims and how they interpret the Quran, it is a lot more detailed. Thats why Quran cant be interpreted by someone who hasnt learned classic and old persian or Bedouin Arabic. As these guys have for 6 and a half years.

It is important to note however that in the classical Arabic lexicon, the word 'Hafiz' was not traditionally used to refer to one who had memorized the Qur'an. Instead, the word used was 'Hamil' (lit. one who carries.) 'Hafiz' was used for the scholars of Hadith, specifically one who had committed 100,000 hadiths to memory (i.e. Al-Hafiz [Ibn Hajar]) In those days, memorizing the Qur'an was so commonplace that it was not even accorded great distinction; today, of course with the study of the Islamic sciences having fallen into disfavor, it becomes a mark of distinction. (You think that this Mufti was lying?)

Sorry gotta go, and please dont accuse me of being something im not =_=.

Thanks for replying.

Submitting....

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Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

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