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Servant of Christ

Reader comment on item: A Christian Boom
in response to reader comment: Messianic Prophecies

Submitted by Sohail (United Kingdom), Dec 14, 2006 at 09:37

If you read Isaiah carefully, you can see that it talks about the Messiah or 'nation' bearing the sins of the Gentiles. Did Israel ever bear the sins of the Gentiles? Did Israel ever hate itself? It's just not grammatically correct.

Servant of Christ can you please you read the following articles:

www.danielpipes.org/comments/68312

www.danielpipes.org/comments/68042

Not all of the verses apply to Jesus. And not all of the verses apply to David. Therefore, some are a foreshadowing of the Messiah. The significance of the first verse is that those were some of the last words Jesus spoke.

Here is another Interpretation for you:

True, the translation of the end of verse 16 (KJV), "of the wicked have inclosed me: they pierced my hands and my feet" is probably wrong. The phrase "k'ari" more likely is "like a lion" -- i.e. "a band of evildoers has surrounded me, like a lion, (at) my hands and feet," and indeed, lions are mentioned elsewhere in that Psalm, but that is only one detail.

The main problems with your interpretation are 1) they take a few verses out of the context of the whole Psalm and ignore others, and 2) there is a much more likely explanation which does indeed fit the psalm as a whole.

Verse 6 (KJV) in particular does not fit what you think about Jesus. "But I am a worm, ..." This is not humility. This is pathological self abasement. Do you assert that Jesus was G-d, and that G-d thinks of himself as a worm? This is so bizarre as to border on blasphemy. The middle of the psalm is equally untenable for you. The psalmist does not say something like, "I'll bring peace and salvation," as one would expect from a self sacrificing god. Rather he says, "Save me and I'll tell everyone how great You are." (Vs 21-22 (KJV).)

On a more mundane level, there is too much livestock for this to refer to the crucifixion. The Psalmist refers to bulls, lions, and dogs, and even unicorns (according to the KJV version). You might reply that these are intended to be metaphorical, but then you must ask -- who gets to determine which detail is metaphor and how the metaphor is interpreted? If the lions and bulls are metaphors, why are not the bones out of joint and the cleaving tongue also metaphors?

Taking the Psalm as a whole, and fitting it in with what we know of David, the explanation is fairly obvious. This psalm is one of the cries of David who is in deep depression while fleeing Saul and his troops. King David was a spiritual giant, but having the Anointed of HaShem (i.e. King Saul) and half the kingdom trying to kill you can depress anyone. David resolves this depression, as he does in other psalms, by his faith in HaShem. The verses follow a consistent progression of ideas.

Isaiah 9:6 refers to the 'child' or the Messiah. This child was to be called God. That child was the Messiah, and the Messiah was Jesus.

Servant of Christ there is a mistranslation in this verse: The two letter word "is", is usually not stated in Hebrew. Rather,"is" is understood. For example, the words "hakelev" (the dog) and "gadol" (big), when joined into a sentence -- hakelev gadol -- means "the dog IS big," even though no Hebrew word in that sentence represents the word "is." A more accurate translation of the name of that child, then, would be "A wonderful counselor is the mighty G-d, the everlasting father ..." Like the name "Emanuel," this name describes G-d, not the person who carries the name.

Another problem is the context: Biblical names often describe G-d, and no one thinks to apply the description to the people with these names. The name Isaiah itself means "G-d is salvation," and not that the prophet himself is G-d in a human body. Were we to use the same logic that Christians use on the names in Isaiah 7:14 and 9:6, we would say that "Tuviya" (G-d is good), "Yedaya" (G-d knows), and "Ya-el" (HaShem is G-d) also are all G-d.

Answer this question once more, how can Jesus be a prophet of God if he claimed he was God

He was Mad. He was probably lying or sombody could have messed up his work.

Sohail

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