1 readers online now  |  69 million page views

More on a Christian church in Saudi Arabia

Reader comment on item: Churches in Saudi Arabia?

Submitted by Gloria Stewart (United States), Apr 16, 2008 at 22:40

So many items to respond to, but such a dazzling array of possibilities!

First, while Muslims can quote seemingly peaceful phrases from the Qu'ran, let us not forget that most non Muslim scholars divide the Qu'ran into two parts. The first was written when Mohammed was in Mecca and had a small number of followers. He did not have the strength of numbers to be aggressive. After he went to Medina and his numbers increased, the more violent exhortations were written. There is also in Islam the Principle of Abrogation. It holds that if two verses of the Qu'ran seemingly contradict each other, the later one is to be upheld.

Yes there are Christian fanatics today, but their activities are limited to the private square. Do we really care about their dietary habits; the length of time they spend reading the Bible, or if they think that anyone not agreeing with them is doomed? They do not fly airplanes into buildings.

As for dhimmitude, it is still practiced today in Muslim majority countries. It originated with the second Caliph, Omar ibn al-Khattib. This Treaty of Omar is also known as the Treaty of Humiliation. Among other prohibitions, non Muslims were not allowed public religious ceremonies, or church bells, and they could not build new churches or repair old ones without government consent (which rarely if ever was extended). They had to pray quietly so as not to disturb Muslims. They could not strike a Muslim even in self defense. They could only beg for mercy. They could not ride horses or camels, only donkeys. Their testimony had little or no value in court. They could not lie down or sit in the presence of a Muslim. If they found themselves on a walkway and a Muslim approached, they had to go into the street. Is that enough? I am sure that there were from time to time enlightened Muslim leaders who made exceptions. I am equally sure that there were from time to time kindly slave owners.

Now, for examples of Muslims destroying churches. For the sake of brevity, I will cite two examples though in reality today there are too many examples to cite and throughout history so many, many more.

No blood shed upon Muslim entry into Jerusalem? Not for long. In 1009 Hatem, the Fatimite Caliph of Egypt ordered the destruction of the Holy Sepulchre and all Christian establishments in Jerusalem.

In November 2003 thirteen Christian churches in Kazaure, in Northern Nigeria (which is Muslim and has established Sharia) were burned to the ground.

I am so glad that Islam is a religion of peace; imagine if it were not.

Gloria Stewart

Submitting....

Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

Comment on this item

Mark my comment as a response to More on a Christian church in Saudi Arabia by Gloria Stewart

Email me if someone replies to my comment

Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

See recent outstanding comments.

Follow Daniel Pipes

Facebook   Twitter   RSS   Join Mailing List

All materials by Daniel Pipes on this site: © 1968-2021 Daniel Pipes. daniel.pipes@gmail.com and @DanielPipes

Support Daniel Pipes' work with a tax-deductible donation to the Middle East Forum.Daniel J. Pipes

(The MEF is a publicly supported, nonprofit organization under section 501(c)3 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Contributions are tax deductible to the full extent allowed by law. Tax-ID 23-774-9796, approved Apr. 27, 1998.

For more information, view our IRS letter of determination.)