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Stan Goodman, Muhammad's history

Reader comment on item: Is Allah God? - Continued
in response to reader comment: Of course it's the same deity; the difference is in the believers

Submitted by Infidel (Canada), Oct 1, 2006 at 20:23

Since you choose not to to ignore my sarcastic response, I will share some history of Allah and Muhammad with you. Muhammad was orphaned at an early age and was raised by his uncle. As a young man he made a very wise decision and married a wealthy widow by the name of Kadijah. Kadijah owned a store, and Muhammad spent much of his life traveling with caravans ,trading goods for Kadijah's store. Muhammad suffered from epilepsy, and often spent time in a cave meditating. On one of these occasions, after a severe epileptic seizure, Gabriel came to Muhammad and ordered him to recite. And thus came the Qur'an, which means "to recite", to Muhammad. And "recite" became a key component as Muhammad could neither read nor write.

Islam has as its focus of worship a deity by the name of "Allah." The Muslims claim that Allah in pre-Islamic times was the biblical God of the Patriarchs, prophets, and apostles. In fact, he was the Moon-god. Archaeologists have uncovered temples to the Moon-god throughout the Middle East. From the mountains of Turkey to the banks of the Nile, the most widespread religion of the ancient world was the worship of the Moon-god. In the first literate civilization, the Sumerians have left us thousands of clay tablets in which they described their religious beliefs. The ancient Sumerians worshipped a Moon-god who was called many different names. The most popular names were Nanna, Suen and Asimbabbar. His symbol was the crescent moon.

Given the amount of artifacts concerning the worship of this Moon-god, it is clear that this was the dominant religion in Sumeria. The cult of the Moon-god was the most popular religion throughout ancient Mesopotamia. The Assyrians, Babylonians, and the Akkadians took the word Suen and transformed it into the word Sin as their favorite name for the Moon-god. In ancient Syria and Canna, the Moon-god Sin was usually represented by the moon in it's crescent phase. According to numerous inscriptions, while the name of the Moon-god was Sin, his title was al-ilah, i.e. "the deity," meaning that he was the chief or high god among the gods. Thus "the god Il or Ilah was originally a phase of the Moon God." The Moon-god was called al-ilah, i.e. the god, which was shortened to Allah in pre-Islamic times.

The pagan Arabs even used Allah in the names they gave to their children. For example, both Muhammad's father and uncle had Allah as part of their names. The fact that they were given such names by their pagan parents proves that Allah was the title for the Moon-god even in Muhammad's day. Thus, under Mohammed's tutelage, the relatively anonymous Ilah, became Al-Ilah, The God, or Allah, the Supreme Being."
Thus your point that the Hebrew God was co-opted by Muhammad for his needs (reducing inter-tribal warfare based on hostile competition between tribal deities) in wrong. Having studied Muhammad's history from an author who was hostile to Islam and a Muslim author, I found no evidence or reference to Muhammad being involved in warfare until he tried to convert the Arabs of Mecca and they resisted. Muhammad eventually moved to Medina where is fortunes improved considerably; he formed and army, gained considerable wealth and prestige by robbing caravans and eventually he took over Mecca.

Mr. Goodman, I'm familiar with the Qur'an and the Bible, and I can tell you today that there is nothing common between Islam, Christianity and Judaism except for the confused Ayas plagiarized from the Torah. I found rather amusing that not a word was borrowed by the Qur'an from the New Testament Bible, I wonder why? You could almost conclude that Muhammad found a wayward Jew in Medina, not a problem as there were an estimated 30 thousand Jews living in Medina including Dhu Nuwas who hated and persecuted Christians and he may have taught Muhammad everything he knew about Judaism. In any event there are many references in the Qur'an to the Torah. However, it is obvious that the two books do not bring the same message.

Submitting....

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