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First real example of Moderate Muslims fighting Jehadi Muslims ! Please support moderates fully.

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in response to reader comment: muslims beheading peaceful buddists in thailand

Submitted by kurgi (India), May 25, 2007 at 15:25

First real example of Moderate Muslims fighting Jehadi Muslims .

yes , its Lebanon where Lebanese Army is crushing Islamic Jehadis of Fatah al Islam and other Palestinian Terrorists in so called refugee camps ( Terrorist Training Camps) in Lebanon.

We must support USA , UK and West Military Aid to Lebanese Army to crush this evil nexus of Fatah Al Islam , Hizballah , Hamas and Hizballah in these refugee camps.

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The military airlift began in earnest Friday as the United States rushed ammunition and other equipment to the Lebanese army. Two military transports landed at the Beirut airport in the morning, spotted by many residents of the capital. The military refused to comment, apparently because of the sensitivity of the matter.

Security officials, however, said that a United Arab Emirates air force plane had landed late Thursday with the first supplies. The officials spoke on customary condition of anonymity because they were not authorized to speak to the media.

Also Thursday, a Pentagon official said the United States would provide ammunition and other equipment to the Lebanese army in a military airlift of eight planes. A U.S. military official said the Lebanese government had asked the U.S. to expedite a shipment of a broad range of equipment and ammunition already in the pipeline for delivery.

Lebanese officials subsequently told Washington they needed the ammunition right away, the official said. All of the materials en route had previously been requested, the agreements were already in place, and they were in the delivery process, the official said.

The fighting in Lebanon, which erupted Sunday when police raided suspected Fatah Islam hideouts in Tripoli while searching for men wanted in a bank robbery, has killed some 50 combatants and many civilians.

Thousands of Palestinian civilians -- mainly women and children -- have fled the camp on the outskirts of this northern port city, but thousands still remain inside. (Watch Palestinians flee during a lull in the combat )

Amid the swell of international support, Prime Minister Fouad Siniora vowed to wipe out Fatah Islam. In a televised address Thursday, he said that Fatah Islam was "a terrorist organization ... attempting to ride on the suffering and the struggle of the Palestinian people."

"We will work to root out and strike at terrorism, but we will embrace and protect our brothers in the camps," Saniora said, insisting Lebanon has no quarrel with the 400,000 Palestinian refugees living in the country.

Under a 1969 agreement, Lebanese military stays out of the camps that are run by the Palestinians.

But Abu Salim Taha, a spokesman for the militants, late Thursday repeated that Fatah Islam would never surrender or flee but "fight until the last moment, the last drop of blood and the last bullet."

Storming the Nahr el-Bared camp -- a densely built-up town of narrow streets on the Mediterranean coast -- could mean rough urban fighting for Lebanese troops and further death and destruction for the civilians inside. (Watch how militant Islamists moved into the camps to recruit )

It could also spark unrest in Lebanon's 11 other Palestinian refugee camps. Although Palestinian factions have dissociated themselves from Fatah Islam, refugees in other camps, which are rife with armed groups, are angry over army bombardments that have partially destroyed Nahr el-Bared.

Underscoring the danger, three bombs have exploded in the Beirut area since Sunday, killing one woman and injuring about 20.

Fatah Islam has denied responsibility for the bombings but has threatened to take the battle outside the Tripoli camp if the army attacks.Several transport planes carrying military aid for the Lebanese army from the US and its Arab allies have arrived at Beirut airport.

The move follows an appeal for such aid by the Lebanese government.

Its forces are battling Islamist militants who have taken over the Nahr al-Bared Palestinian refugee camp in northern Lebanon.

US Secretary of State Condoleezza Rice has reiterated Washington's support for the Lebanese government.

She said gunmen in Nahr al-Bared were trying to destabilise a democratic government.

A Red Cross food convoy from the Jordanian capital, Amman, is travelling overland through Syria and is expected in northern Lebanon later on Friday.

'Criminal gang'

The transport planes have come from US bases in the region as well as several Arab allies of the US in the Middle East.

The military supplies are believed to include ammunition for automatic rifles and heavy weapons, spare parts for military helicopters and night-vision equipment.

Reports from the area talk of sporadic gunfire exchanges between government troops and Fatah al-Islam fighters as the Lebanese army continues to build up around Nahr al-Bared, near the port city of Tripoli.Thousands of people have fled the camp as aid workers struggle to deliver food and medicine to thousands still inside.

Lebanese Prime Minister Fouad Siniora has vowed not to "surrender to terrorism".

He said he would end the conflict "without hesitation" and described Fatah al-Islam as a criminal gang hiding behind Islam and the Palestinian cause.

The BBC's Jon Leyne, reporting from close to Nahr al-Bared, says the Lebanese army is in position in force outside the camp; inside, the militants are determined not to surrender.

At least 50 soldiers and militants have been killed in the fighting at the camp so far. The civilian death toll is not known.

Bank robbery

The fighting at the camp is the bloodiest internal conflict in Lebanon since the civil war ended 17 years ago.

It began after security forces raided a building in Tripoli to arrest suspects in a bank robbery. Fatah al-Islam militants then attacked army posts at the entrances to the camp.

A large force of Lebanese troops hit back, bombarding the camp and storming a building on the outskirts of Tripoli.

Fatah al-Islam is a radical Palestinian splinter group alleged to have links with al-Qaeda. Lebanese officials also believe it is backed by Syria.

Other Palestinian factions have distanced themselves from the group, which emerged last year.

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