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Deconstructing al-fatiha and mistakes in basic Arabic grammar

Reader comment on item: Friendless in the Middle East
in response to reader comment: Yes! I was so right...

Submitted by dhimmi no more (United States), Feb 26, 2012 at 09:10

For the readers: deobandi/tablighees here in the west tell themselves that they are spreading the tentacles of islam in the west and that Allah will turn the light of islam on!

And how come Allah is unable to turn the light of islam here in the west without the help of the tablighees? any guesses?

So what is the disaster of the day? It is the اياك نعبد واياك نستعين

Oh let us see it had to be edited by the ulama by adding a shadda above the yeh in iyaka and do you know why? because your Arab masters would read the word ayak without a shadda as beware or be careful of or guard against or be wary and here is the reference http://www.almaany.com/home.php?language=arabic&lang_name=English&word=%D8%A5%D9%8A%D8%A7%D9%83&type_word=0

Unless Allah is saying to be wary of praying to him so is he saying that?

But the ulama had to come to the rescue and add a shadda to a word that they tell us exists in the Qur'an only in surat al-fatiha and that is iyaka

But this is not the end of this disaster this poor grammar and for the readers the grammar of the basic Arabic sentence is as follows

Verb then subject then object

And for those of you that can read Arabic here is an example

كتب الكاتب الكتاب

Or فعل فاعل مفعول or verb subject object

Now in the above Quranic jumla we have the subject then the verb!

What a disaster the author is the Qur'an cannot even get it right

Now let us turn to islamic sources and this is what al-Tabari and others tell us about this little grammatical disaster

كلمة اياك لم ترد في القران الكريم الا في هذه الاية

Or the word iyaka is only to be found in the Qur'an is this verse

Then we are told

ذكر علماء العربية ان الله تعالة قدم المفعول به اياك على الفعل نعبد ونستعين

Let me interpret this for the readers we are told that the Arab grammarians tell us that Allah indeed placed the subject which is iyaka before the verb which is we pray and we seek help!

Do you know what this means our dear Amin?

1. It means that the Arab grammarians indeed admit that the word ayaka is a strange word that only exists in this aya in the Qur'an and it has no clear meaning

2. It means that they are also saying that this is poor Arabic grammar and a mistake in Arabic grammar by placing the subject before the verb

3. Then to add insult to injury they tell us that the reason for this bit time grammatical mistake is that ليخص العبادة والاستعانة به وحده that this grammatical mistake is made so Allah can tell Muslims that praying and help come from him only! What a disaster and what does this have to do with the fact that this is a mistake in basic Arabic grammar? but again this is what islam is all about lies and delusions

But you know what is the final nail in the coffin of this little sentence and poor grammar? The ulama also tell us that the sentence should be لا نعبد الا اياك and in this case we have the correct Arabic grammar where we have the verb then the subject

Oh and al-Tabari tells us that it should be فانا اياك نعبد

What a disaster they are fixing the poor Quranic grammar

So next time you dish out tablighee nonsense that you will not find a single mistake in Arabic grammar in the Qur'an think of iyaka na3budu oh and in hadhan lasahiran

What a disaster

Submitting....

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