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Repetion of fiction gets you nowhere.

Reader comment on item: Friendless in the Middle East
in response to reader comment: The Muslim basmala is a loan sentence from Syriac part one

Submitted by Amin Riaz (United Kingdom), Jan 11, 2012 at 20:59

Have anything more to add to this ... and other proof evidence ....rather than repeating this fictional claim over and over and over?

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if so then he must be aware that the Quranic word bism or بسم is poor Arabic and it should be b'ism or بإسم and this is indeed good Arabic and this is the Arabic

No it shouldn't - Allah didn't convey a written Quran... (Unlike the Ten Commandments Tablet). That is not the Muslims claim. It was written down according to the norms of the time....

Also this shows more lack of ignorance of Arabic Grammar.

The differenc between Hamza Qati and Hamza Wasli

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hamza

The hamza letter on its own always represents hamzat qaṭʿ (همزة قطع, in Egypt [ˈhæmzet ˈʔɑtˤʕ]); that is, a phonemic glottal stop. Compared to this, hamzat waṣl or hamzatu l-waṣl (همزة الوصل, in Egypt [ˈhæmzet ˈwɑsˤl]) is a non-phonemic glottal stop produced automatically at the beginning of an utterance. It is written as alif carrying a waṣlah sign ٱ (only in Koranic texts) and normally indicated by a regular alif without a hamza. It occurs, for example, in the definite article al-, ism, ibn, imperative verbs and the perfective aspect of verb forms VII to X, but is not pronounced following a vowel in Modern Standard Arabic: (e.g. al-baytu l-kabīru for written البيت الكبير). It occurs only in the beginning of words (can occur after prepositions and the definite article).

And now .... go and allege whole Arabic is made up.... blah blah blah...

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In MSA and CLassical - Hamza Wasli is not pronounced unless if at the beginning of sentence. It is optional to write it or drop it.

Interesting usage is by Arab Christians:

بسم الآب والإبن والروح القدس الاله الواحد آمين

باسم الآب والإبن والروح القدس الاله الواحد آمين

They use both versions.

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And this proves exactly what:

And this is the title افوض واءل غنيم للتحدث بإسم ثوار مصر or I elect Wael Ghonim as the speaker IN THE NAME (B'ism) the revolution in Egypt

This translation shows lack

takhaduth is the verbal noun... it cannot be translated as "Speaker" .... here it means "to speak"

Mutakhadith - the Active Participle - translates as "Speaker".

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And try not to confuse Fusha with Aamiyah.... devious

Submitting....

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