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Remember your little trouble over Arabic Adverbs!

Reader comment on item: Friendless in the Middle East
in response to reader comment: The Qur'an is the most edited so called holy book and more Quranic disasters

Submitted by Amin Riaz (United Kingdom), Jan 7, 2012 at 22:47

Oh dear, standard of your fairy tales has really slipped. You used make up better fiction than this.

Oh and then we are told that it is the Arabic Qur'an as in Q12:2 so let us read the confused rasm of this little gem

ورـا عرــا which had to be edited by the ulama as قرا ءنا عربيا or Arabic Qur'an but this is indeed poor Arabic as it should have been قراءن عربي and what a karitha Allah cannot spell perfect Arabic words that had to be edited but wait the dead give away that this is not even Arabic and it is Syriac that is Arabized is the letter alif at the end of the words Qur'an and Arabic as this is the Syriac alif so let us see that this would be in its original Syriac ܩܪܝܢܐ ܥܪܒܝܐ or qeryana 'arbaya or lectionary of the west of the lectionary of Friday (when Jesus died)

I have already answered this once ... this person dhimmi is not even aware of Arabic Basics.

Indefinite Nouns that are accusative take an alif - unless of unchangeable ending.

اكلت كثيرا

I ate a lot. Kathiran is accusative and indefinite - so takes the alif.

قتلت رجلا عربيا I killed an Arab man.

احمل قراءنا I am carrying a Quran.

Remember this my dear darling Dhimmi - remember when you had this little trouble over Arabic adverbs.

Now have you learned about Verb Conjugation... or going to laugh at it..... lets call it "Pakistani"

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The editing claim is strange one.... what is it that has been edited. And why is it that "editors" not take away the alif. If according to you it is a mistake. Or did they not know what they were editing.

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Ref:

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Arabic_grammar#Nominative_case

"For singular nouns and broken plurals, it is marked as a fatḥah (-a) for the definite or fatḥah + nunation (-an) for the indefinite. For the indefinite accusative, the fatḥah + nunation is added to an ʼalif e.g. ـًا, which is added to the ending of all nouns (e.g. كان تعباناً kāna taʻbāna(n) "he was tired") not ending with a ʼalif followed by hamzah or a tāʼ marbūṭah. The dual and regular masculine plural are formed by adding -ayn(i) and -īn(a) (both spelled ـين in Arabic) respectively (-ay and -ī in the construct state, both spelled ـي in Arabic). The regular feminine plural is formed by adding -āt(i) in the definite and -āt(in) in the indefinite, both spelled ـات in Arabic."

http://arabic.desert-sky.net/g_cases.html

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Submitting....

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