69 million page views

The difficulties of modification of Islam

Reader comment on item: Q&A: Remaking a Religion

Submitted by Erich W (United States), Jan 4, 2011 at 16:48

I am very impressed by Mark Durie's sensitive and scholarly book called The Third Choice. In the first chapters he documents how "Islam works", indirectly showing just how difficult it is for Islamic rulings to be modified. At the same time, he documents how debates do arise, and how they are pursued. What is more important, he shows how these debates affect the lives of millions who are subjected to the cruelty of the Sharia. As much as I have been around Islam, read fine works on Islam as well as the Quran, I find this little book teaches me new things seemingly on every page. He makes incisive comments on how the system of Sharia interpretation works, and how the ethics of Sharia itself affect the ability to publicly debate or discuss Sharia. There are many "no go" zones, because some things that determine the course of many people's lives, are frankly very embarrassing to Islam and to Mohammed. Some facts of Mohammed's life create laws and shape societies, but are beyond the pale of public discussion. Durie shows the interaction of Haddith, Sira and Quran, in the structure of Sharia, so that one can understand how locked in Islam is on so many details of life. One gets the idea that the only way out of bad or out-dated aspects of Sharia is to ignore the related texts, so as to cover over the shame. The tactic of ignoring authentic texts, though, will always bump up against honest interpreters. What is really new is that many Muslims and non-Muslims are now learning more than they were ever intended to learn. The unprecedented light of transparency may force whole new approaches and social movements. "Authentic texts," I imagine, will have to be placed in a light that, one way or another, de-emphasizes and marginalizes them...or many Muslims will just reject much of their faith's origins, period. Perhaps a whole new use of the doctrine of "abrogation" may set in, by which all that causes shame and harm and constant conflict, will be seen, effectively, as abrogated.

Durie is pastorally concerned mainly for the human rights, the psychology and the spirituality of the so called Dhimi populations. I hope his book get's translated into Arabic and other languages. It is a very probing book because it unfolds the deep dishonesty about Islamic supremecism that both Muslims and non-Muslims rather blindly conspire to support. Sometimes when truth comes, change comes too.

Submitting....

Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

Comment on this item

Mark my comment as a response to The difficulties of modification of Islam by Erich W

Email me if someone replies to my comment

Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

See recent outstanding comments.

Follow Daniel Pipes

Facebook   Twitter   RSS   Join Mailing List

All materials by Daniel Pipes on this site: © 1968-2023 Daniel Pipes. daniel.pipes@gmail.com and @DanielPipes

Support Daniel Pipes' work with a tax-deductible donation to the Middle East Forum.Daniel J. Pipes

(The MEF is a publicly supported, nonprofit organization under section 501(c)3 of the Internal Revenue Code.

Contributions are tax deductible to the full extent allowed by law. Tax-ID 23-774-9796, approved Apr. 27, 1998.

For more information, view our IRS letter of determination.)