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Wahhabism and "Confessions of a British spy"

Reader comment on item: CAIR: 'Moderate' friends of terror

Submitted by Jack Davies (United States), Apr 23, 2002

There is a little known article on the web that can be accessed by typing the words "confessions of a british spy" into a search engine.

It concerns a british spy plot to destabilize the Ottoman Empire in the early 1700's. The article, if genuine (and it appears to be) was translated into english from a Turkish document.

It relates the story of how a young Muslim, Wahhabi, by name was "recruited" by a British spy (Hempher). The purpose of the plot was to cause Muslims to begin fighting amongst themselves and therebye distract the Ottoman authorities from what was really going on. This was to be achieved by corrupting the mainstream Muslim religions.

This man went on to begin the Wahhabi movement in what is now Saudi Arabia. As we all know, that is where the "big bucks" are coming from that support the Muslim extremists that continue to howl for the blood of those who don't think as they do.

As indicated in that document the relationship between Wahhabi and the tribal chief that protected him during the startup period continues to this day in the modern rulers of that country and the Wahhabi religion..

It is a fascinating "read" in light of what is now happening in the world and if you follow the thought and begin to research other articles on the net, many placed there by Muslims fighting back, you are going to be appalled.

There is a great deal of information available to read and it is well worth the time spent digging for it.

I recommend "confessions of a british spy" to everyone as a great place to start on the path to "enlightenment" regarding peaceful Muslims today and the problems that they face.

As a person who knew absolutely nothing about Muslims before I read this article, it heightened my interest as I began to explore the web. That effort has created an entirely different picture of the current unrest and the reasons for it in my mind.

It may do the same for you.

Submitting....

Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

Daniel Pipes replies:

I devote much attention to this fascinating document in my book, The Hidden Hand: Middle East Fears of Conspiracy (New York: St. Martin's Press, 1996), pp. 211-12. See http://www.danielpipes.org/article/1648. You can see an extract at "The Saga of Hempher, Purported British Spy: an extract from The Hidden Hand: Middle East Fears of Conspiracy."

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Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

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