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Religious violence.

Reader comment on item: The Alawi Capture of Power in Syria
in response to reader comment: sorry buy i had to laugh

Submitted by Treize (Netherlands), Sep 4, 2013 at 15:59

You cannot compare Dutch culture with the culture of immigrants.

We are not like the USA were immigrants are proud to be American, whilst retaining their own culture. Here most immigrants from countries like Turkey and Morocco do not consider themselves Dutch at all, here we have third generation immigrants who dream of emigrating to the country of their grandparents after finishing university/college. It is shamefull, if you ask me, that these young and oftern modern people don't feel at home here but I need to admit it has alot to do with their self-segregation and 'nationalism' (our rather cold and individualist society is also a secondary factor).

If a Salafist of Moroccan background kills a man this is not very representative for our society. This is no Syria where they have thousands of Islamists just waiting to kill (and rape) Christians and Alawites (Nusayri's) for the sake of their religion.

As for the Hirshi Ali women, she lied in order to get assylum and citizenship. The truth came out and her citizenship was revoked. Is this somehow strange? No.

As for the point I was trying to make:

How can the rather pessimistic Alawi belief of predestination, as described in the Alawi book Kitab al-Usus (among other many other writings), be reconciled with considering everybody a child of God?

Atleast that was before I realised cafer is an atheist now.

As for this belief in predestination, it seems to be a little contradicting with some of their other beliefs and their history in which they did allow conversion into the sect.

I would like to know how modern day Alawi's think of the fact that the Divine is said to have manifested itself before multiple nations as the Creatures of Light (Ahl-e Nur) are supposedly spread among all nations. Yet modern day Alawi's are Arabs (and a few Kurds and Turks who were allowed to convert long ago). So I would like to know how they really think of non-Alawi's, if only the people who are Alawi now are the ahl-e nur or maybe if they consider the possibility there are others besides them among other nations. If not, how can you be so sure that the people who have converted to the Alawi religion in the past were these Ahl-e Nur? And how can you be so sure they were the only ones, considering the fact the religion is totally closed today?

I would like to have contact about this issue with an Alawi or a former Alawi like cafer in order to discuss some of these seemingly contradicting issues.

One can contact me at: Treize-Info@mail.com

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Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

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