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To "Dhimmi no more"

Reader comment on item: Is Allah God?
in response to reader comment: Nuray: Basic Arabic , kissing a stone, and Allah ...

Submitted by Omar (United States), Jan 21, 2006 at 13:06

I really did understand well your question "what evidence do you have that Allah that pre-Islamic Arabian pagan deity is indeed the God of the Jews and Christians and the Hindus and the Buddhists and the rest of humanity?"

Sorry if my answer on that question may not be so accurate, and excuse me for my lack of knowledge about Buddhism and Hinduism, but whenever I try to read about these religions I just always here about "different sects and beliefs". However, again I say that I made such exclusions because these religions were not mentioned in the Quran.

I really don't understand why you are concerned about "Allah the pre-Islamic Arabian pagan deity". The pre-Islamic Arabic had different beliefs about God/Gods. Muslims believe in God as described in the Quran and by the Prophet, and totally ignoring pre-Islamic Arabian beliefs and practices. The description of "Allah" in the Quran has nothing to with the Arabian Culture or pre-Islamic Arabia.

If you want to make your own comparison and understand the concept of God within Islam, visit (sorry for mentioning this website many times!):

http://www.usc.edu/dept/MSA/fundamentals/tawheed/

If you are really annoyed about the name "ALLAH" then I would like to tell you that Muslims believe that God has 99 names:

"Allaah has ninety-nine names, 100 less one, whoever counts them shall enter Paradise..." [Saheeh Al-Bukhaari, Volume 8, Number 419]

See: http://www.usc.edu/dept/MSA/fundamentals/tawheed/namesofallaah.html

This whole conversation is about "ALLAH and if he is GOD". I think a Muslim would disagree for two reasons. Saying that Allah is not God means that there 2 GODS who have full control over the universe. Therefore, Muslims would like then to argue that their concepts and beliefs about God may be different.

The other reason Muslims would argue is because setting a certain religion (or sect) as a standard for god seems unfair. There is no doubt that there are differences in the concepts and beliefs of God in different religions. For example, not all religions may believe in the concept of "Al-Qadar" ...the control and power of Allah over all things and events, regardless of whether we in our limited knowledge consider them good or bad. However, such belief doesn't make Allah totally different from the One God which Jews and Christians believe in.

For Al-Qadar, see http://www.usc.edu/dept/MSA/fundamentals/pillars/

It is unfair setting one division of Christianity or any other religion as a Standard and that if their beliefs about God or the Trinity are different, then they don't believe in God (and telling them: "go and find another name!!!").
Submitting....

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Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

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