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Division if in Israel, It was and is always cultural. Not related to "racism". By in large.

Reader comment on item: Smoking Out Islamists via Extreme Vetting
in response to reader comment: "Racism" is a greatly exaggerated phenomenon

Submitted by Ely Postal (United States), Jun 21, 2020 at 13:00

Division if in Israel, It was and is always cultural. Not related to "racism". By in large.

Facts are facts.
No matter how hard lefty propaganda inside Israel and goliath anti Israel machine outside this pluralistic (multi color, albeit more 'brown" than "white", for those that don't know) open democratic society have been repeatedly using, for propaganda purposes and so used to utter hyper terminology till it became "normal" language.

The classic example that out of all groups, it's rather the Ultra Orthodox, (Haredim, Hassidic Jews) group that is feeling most discriminated against, shows once again that it is about way of life and culture. Ultra-orthodox don't have any different "colour" than others in Israel. Unless one is speaking strictly about clothes...

This is not to say that there is any society free of biases. But by in large, in israel, it is not a "race" thing. That besides the understandable worry of racist attacks by Arabs targeting Jewish civilians almost in any case. Or restrictions Israelis might take, especially at high terror "seasons", against other citizens who happen to be of the same Arab "race" as Arab Israelis. Otherwise known since the 1960s as Palestinians.

____

'10 Myths you have about the ultra-Orthodox,'
They actually work more, take the most mortgages and smoke the least
Shoshana Chen, Yediot Achronot, May 11, 2018
A sense of discrimination
Myth: The Arabs are the most discriminated against in Israel, and that is how they feel.
Reality: The pinnacle of discrimination belongs to the ultra-Orthodox. While 23% of Arabs feel discrimination against 3% of the non-ultra-Orthodox Jewish public, 32% of ultra-Orthodox men feel 35%, and men 28%. "I was surprised too," Kasir admits. "From ultra-Orthodox colleagues, I heard different explanations for this. The most common was," Discriminating against us in workplaces, "among working ultra-Orthodox people, but when asked if they personally experienced it, they answered," No, but it is known. " Which reinforces previously hidden feelings. " These feelings in men can also be explained by the external appearance, which exceeds them more in the labor market and as recipients of services. By the way, the sense of discrimination is rising among the ultra-Orthodox with the rise in age, in contrast to the other sectors of Israeli society.
https://www.yediot.co.il/articles/0,7340,L-5256707,00.htm

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