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Answering a Question with a Question!

Reader comment on item: The Deceits of Bridges TV
in response to reader comment: To Mr Amith Parsotam

Submitted by Amith parsotam (United Kingdom), Mar 18, 2009 at 13:43

The Qur'an is regarded as the highest form of tafsir, on the belief that the Qu'ran is the word of God, in Arabic called Allah, and authoritative when it explains itself. A related Muslim belief is that the Qur'an is free of contradiction, and that apparent inconsistencies in its message are inevitably resolved through closer study of the Qur'anic text.

  1. The hadith. Muslims believe that the Islamic prophet Muhammad was sent, among other reasons, to explain and communicate the Qur'an to people. The accounts of Muhammad's teaching recorded in the hadith collections thus contain much tafsir of the Qur'an, under titles such as "Meaning of Qur'anic verses." An authenticated hadith is regarded the second highest form of tafsir, because Muhammad is explaining it -- but many of these traditions are disputed.
  2. The reports of the Sahaba. The Sahaba, or companions of Muhammad, also interpreted and taught the Qur'an. If Qur'anic explication is absent, and there is no authentic tradition deriving from Muhammad, then a consensus of the companions may be helpful in interpreting a certain verse. Scholars have an obligation to follow that consensus.
  3. The reports of those who learned from the companions. These people grew up in an environment with people who had known Muhammad, so their insight is the next in line of the sources of tafsir. (In addition, the recorded practice of those who lived in Muhammad's city of Medina carries special weight in the Maliki school.)
  4. Reason. A qualified scholar's personal reasoning (deductive logic and personal evaluation of arguments) is the final method of understanding the Qur'an; it exists in conjunction with the other four. Early caliphs are strongly associated with this method of tafsir.

Did u mean Invinted

Invented

Invited

The Quran was sent down in the clear language (Arabic) which has a systematic way of shaping words one can know the meaning by knowing the root and the form the word was coined from. The Quran was not always a book it was first past down by recitation and the ability to commit it to memory. It was only transferred to paper +-200 AD. It seems that all stats referring to Muslims are always 80%, Could give me a web site or URL link for this information please.

There are for main imams in Islam who paved the way for other muslins and those rules and guidelines have not since being changed.

Hanafi- Imam Abu Hanifa an-Nu'man, Maliki- Imam Malik ibn Anas, Shafi'i- Imam Muhammad ibn Idris ash-Shafi'i and Hanbali- Imam Ahmad.

Which bring me to my original Question, could you show me exactly where in the Quran does it say that the imam's shari3a should be eliminated?

Submitting....

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