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What Islam is

Reader comment on item: Talking Freely about the Enemy

Submitted by Mitzi Alvin (United States), Dec 27, 2005 at 13:01

It is, in my opinion, not worth much to look into the sacred texts of a religion. Any searcher with an agenda will find some statement justifying his point of view. In order to see what a religion is all about, it is best to investigate its traditions. Which of its doctrines are followed by mainstream adherents; which are ignored or followed only as a tactic of rhetorical strategy.

Islam, from its inception has been intolerant, aggressive, violence-prone, misogynistic, and, in essence, immoral by any standards other than those of its own self-promotion.

Of course, every religion is intolerant to some degree. There was a time when Christianity was more bigoted than Islam, but, for the most part, it has evolved into a much more open-minded entity. Islam appears to have regressed. As for aggression, one of the earliest acts of the prophet was to make war on the Jews for refusing to recognize his message. Most of Islam's gains have been through war and conquest. Its present-day murderous policies are reflections of its violent past and even the so-called "moderates" who appear to reject suicide bombings couch their condamnations with words of understanding, excuses, and even with a kind of tacit approval. The misogyny is too obvious to elaborate on. Honor killings abound, males control female fates almost absolutely, and women are held responsible for the control of male sexuality by modesty codes that are, in some places, physically dangerous. The Saudis call their women, swathed in long black outfits, "Shadows."

And why do I say Islam is immoral? Because, all one has to do is say the magic word, Jihad, and he can do anything. Suddenly, lying, stealing, breaking one's word, and murder itself, including mass murder, turns into honorable, pious activity if iihad is invoked. Any objective ethical code can be immediately nullified by calling it an act of holy war. Of course, it's necessary to get the approval of a few clerics, but there is always some respected imam around to put the "Good Muslim Seal of Approval" on any action, no matter how heinous, as long as it can be given some Islamic rationalization, especially if the victim is an infidel. Although, I would guess, that most victims of Muslim violence have been Muslims themselves.

Ultimately, there is no reason why Islam couldn't change. Christianity changed (for the most part). But it is a necessity of the first order for the world to acknowledge exactly what Islam is. And second, for the Muslim mentality to begin a practice, not much in evidence so far, of self-criticism.
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