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1567 "A learned commendation of the politique lawes of Englande / newly translated into Englishe by Robert Mulcaster."

Reader comment on item: Conservatism's Hidden History

Submitted by Robert (United States), Aug 29, 2018 at 23:07

Dear Daniel Pipes,

First, I'm very sorry for my numerous typographical errors.
Now that I know that you pay attention to your posts on your cite,
I'll make an extra effort at least to check for typos at least once.

I want to bring your attention to the fact that the TITLE PAGE you posted
of Sir John Fortescue book is dated DC.XVI. = 1616, not 1470.
The earliest version I could find in the USA
is dated 1567,and is an alleged new translation from the Latin.
It is available at HATHI TRUST here:

1567
"A learned commendation of the politique lawes of Englande /
newly translated into Englishe by Robert Mulcaster."

https://catalog.hathitrust.org/Record/100217104

It wasn't until the Reign of Queen Elizabeth I 1603 beginning)
that books became more readable,
as you can see by examining this PDF of the 1567 imprint.

Now I want to demonstrate how Revolutionary Fortescue was
by quoting 2 paragraph from Britannica online.
Incidentally, this was a "Revolutionary" time of "Civil War"
known as the War of the Rose.

Here are the 2 paragraphs
which I think show that Fortescue was neither a Conservative nor a Liberal,
but a Radical Revolutionary (in the modern sense of the latter term:

"Sir John Fortescue, (born c. 1385, Norris, Somerset, Eng.—died c. 1479, Ebrington, Gloucestershire), jurist, notable for a legal treatise, De laudibus legum Angliae (c. 1470; "In Praise of the Laws of England"), written for the instruction of Edward, prince of Wales, son of the deposed king Henry VI of England. He also stated a moral principle that remains basic to the Anglo-American jury system: It is better that the guilty escape than that the innocent be punished."
...
"Unusual for its time, De laudibus depreciates the Roman-derived civil law and eulogizes the English constitution, statutes, and system of legal education, while offering suggestions for reform. It was probably the first book about law written in a style so simple and lucid as to be comprehensible to the layman."

https://www.britannica.com/biography/John-Fortescue#ref220557

Submitting....

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Daniel Pipes replies:

I am well aware that M. DC. XVI = 1616 and not 1470. That's why I carefully wrote the caption as

A title page of Fortescue's "In Praise of the Laws of England" (c. 1470).

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Note: Opinions expressed in comments are those of the authors alone and not necessarily those of Daniel Pipes. Original writing only, please. Comments are screened and in some cases edited before posting. Reasoned disagreement is welcome but not comments that are scurrilous, off-topic, commercial, disparaging religions, or otherwise inappropriate. For complete regulations, see the "Guidelines for Reader Comments".

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