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The Yemeni Dilemma

Reader comment on item: The Emptying of Yemen

Submitted by M. Tovey (United States), Jun 7, 2011 at 14:38

The circumstances of Yemen present at the same a paradox, and a dilemma. In watching the disintegration of what little presence of an organized civilization in the Aden coast region, it is wondered how such a dramatic characterization of desert life can be of so much fascination to the world; and what are the consequences of ignoring the plight of the people so constrained by their environment, they cannot reach too far beyond the physical borders to find relief from those very things that threaten their existence?

Yemen exists, apparently, in spite of the world that does not know what it is like to be Yemeni? In many ways, Americans have only tattered bits of history of pre-Hispanic exploratory observations of indigenous native populations long ago and since disappeared, for a variety of reasons, but a disintegration of the society being a telling cause of the loss. We may be seeing that for the Yemeni people, unless there is a hope that can be established against the devastating nihilism of the fighting factions that grip the countryside.

To be sure, much can be said of the enmity and antagonistic attitudes that can be found in Yemen against the United States of America, a vital reason for that alienation. The USS Cole will not be forgotten anymore than Khobar or Beirut. But some might wonder what could be achieved in this moment of societal hypoxia, that for the above reason, has Yemen gone too far to be salvaged from the tragedy of history it portends to become?

The entrenchment of the factions are all too lasting to be of any value to 'moderate' as has been tried in Afghanistan; and in this observation, maybe the earlier comment of what might be done to salvage is already beyond normal human endeavors. It is here then that the supernatural resource is become the only hope. From a Biblical perspective, it is now apparently the only Hope in this time, as Dr. Pipes makes this call, "in this darkest hour, Yemenis are on their own." Maybe, but that is when Christians call upon their Almighty God the most….just a suggestion.

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