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Cairo Then - Cairo Now - How Does the Changes of Two Generations (wars) Compare Egypt to Turkey

Reader comment on item: Midnight in Cairo

Submitted by M Tovey (United States), Dec 30, 2021 at 13:46

Setting aside the overwhelming influences of Islam in the Middle East generally and between two contentious fallen empires that have survived to become examples to Western attitudes (sympathies) and extensions of the curiosities that the studies of the ancients prompted, how do each of these modern versions of former ambitions to rule regionally now expect to survive when all the evidence of such continued existence is compromised for not conforming to the expectations imposed by competing drivers of economy and religions?
Cairo in the 1920's occured when attempting to accomodate the victors (British and French, etal) and the Muslim sensibilities were apparently, temporarily, tolerant and the 'wide side' of western living was permitted and the tourism flourished, especialy when the archeologists and seekers of artifacts poked and plundered the relics of kings and queens. Even this observer's relations were intriqued, visiting and being total tourists.
This observer became acquainted with similar world travellers that did the same with Turkey, the period of Attaturk providing a secularistic perception of how a post Islamic society might fare in a world in which the necessity for dominion of one world power over another was not required for humanity to get along in peace.
The Second World War intervening, and the resurgence of similar anti-Semitic antipathies came burgeoning back and Islam was reinvigorated to commence its recapture of the Quranic claims of superiority and reestablishment of Muslim sensibilities.
Though in appearance to some that both nations fared similarly in transitionally entering a world now controlled by non-Muslim sensibilites and being compelled to model after one form of govermental consistency versus another, much has been endured and to this day, neither are comfortable in their current 'democratic' (elected) composition since there are indigent Muslim adherents that would resort to violence in order to return to the dark ages mindset of dominant Islamic adherency.
Which would survive in these modern times(?) Cairo like that in the 20's as modified by an al-Sisi style Egypt; or Ankara as envisioned by Erdogan in his morphing to a modern Islamic regime, maybe similar to Iran?
Anyone?

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