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Confusion in Egyptian Ancient History

Reader comment on item: American Intifada
in response to reader comment: Ancient Assyrians, Biblical confirmations and Modern Syria

Submitted by Tom (United States), Jan 1, 2013 at 18:02

The Libyan pharoah's of Egypt kept poor records making it quite difficult for Egyptian historians to piece Egyptian ancient history together. (All dates given in Biblical Chronological Time years)

Libyan pharoah Shishak 995-974 B.C. attacked Judah's king Rehoboam 979-962 B.C. in Rehoboam's 5th year 974 B.C. (1 Kings 14:25) Shishak (Shehonq I) dies a few months later. Judah's king Abijam reigns 962-959 B.C.

Libyan pharoah Osorkon I 974-938 B.C. Zerah the Ethiopian invades Egypt. An Ethiopian Egyptian army then attacks Judah's king Asa 959-918 B.C. in Asa's 10th year 949 B.C. (2 Chronicles 14:1) & (2 Chronicles 14:9-15) Asa destroys Zerah's 1,000,000 man army.

Libyan pharoah Takelot I 938-915 B.C. Takelot I did not build anything. Government officials did not copperate with him.

Osorkon II 915-888 B.C. build a temple of Bastet in dedication to the cat goddess.

Osorkon II 888 B.C. dies after a few months reign. He is buried in a silver coffin. We know silver had been in abundance in the Middle-East. Israel's king Ahab 921-899 B.C. had given all his silver to Syrian king Ben-Hadad and Judah's king Jehoshaphat 918-893 B.C. had received silver from the Philistines. (1 Kings 20:7) & (2 Chronicles 17:11)

Takelot II 888-873 B.C. had problems with the Libyans in Egypt's north and the Thebeans in Egypt's south fighting over the office of the high priest of Amun.

There is confusion and chaos in Egypt at this time in history. This is the reason Egyptian historians have a hard time in piecing this history together. Assyrian king Shalmaneser III 867-833 B.C. caused Pedibastet of Leontopolis, Egypt to revolt against Sheshonq III in Sheshonq III's 8th year of reign.

Sheshonq III 873-821 B.C. 8th year 865 B.C. Pedibastet revolted against him. The priests of Amun were on Pedibastet and Sheshonq IV side.

The Egyptian king list given in Encyclopedia Americana 1974 edition.

Sheshonq III followed by: Pami,Sheshonq IV,Sheshonq V,Osorkon III,Takelot III & Osorkon IV. I agree with this list over all others.

Pami 821-815 B.C. from Tanis is an obscure king who likely was in conflict with the priest's of Amun. He was likely the grandfather of Osorkon III.

Sheshonq IV 815-807 B.C. from Leontopolis built the triad temple of Amun at Tanis. He received blessings from priests representing Amun.

Sheshonq V 807-770 B.C. from Tanis is Pami's son. He was declared great chief of the Libyans.

The reason I believe the next kings are in perfect sequence. A History of Ancient Egypt by Nicolas Grimal Blackwell Publishing. University of Chicago Press 1987 p.330.

Osorkon III installed a man called Nimlot at Hermopolis, Egypt indicates Osorkon III's reign was 770-742 B.C. for Nimlot surrenders his soldiers to Nubian/Ethiopian king Piankhi (759-728 B.C.) who had invaded Egypt in his 21st year in 738 B.C. Also lets check page 331.

Takelot's III 2 year solo reign had to be 742-740 B.C. Why? Takelot III's sister Shepenwepet was appointed the last Divine Adoratrice of Amun before the next one was a Nubian.

Chronicles of the Pharoah's Peter A. Clayton. Thames & Hudson 1994. page 189 revealed Takelot III's niece married Peftjauabaster (Herakepolis). He joined forces with Osorkon IV (Tanis) Nimlot (Hermopolis) Iput (Leontopolis) led by Tefnakht of (Sais) all claiming to be Libyan pharoahs and they went to war against Nubian/Ethiopian king Piankhi and Piankhi after defeating them made them governors over Egypt.

Assyrian king Tiglath-Pileser III reigned 753-735 B.C. He had a military alliance with Judah's king Ahaz 741-625 B.C. (2 Kings 16:7-10) Their armies defeat Rezin king of Syria and Israel's king Pekah's forces (2 Kings 16:5) by 738 B.C. Hoshea would then assassinate Pekah.

Osorkon IV 740- 725 B.C. was king So whom Israel's king Hoshea 738-729 B.C. tried to build an alliance with against Assyrian king Shalmanesar V. 734-729 B.C. (2 Kings 17:2-3) Osorkon IV later gives Assyrian king Sargon II 728-712 B.C. Horses as tribute.

Osorkon IV was the last Libyan governor reigning at Tanis. Nubian Ethiopian king Piankhi's son Shabaka would roast Tefnakht's son Bocchoris alive for trying to start another revolt in Egypt. Assyrian king Sargon II 728-712 B.C. had crushed the Ethiopian and Egyptian army at Ashdod in 727 B.C. (Isaiah 20:1-5) Bocchoris believed Shabaka had no fight left in him. Bocchoris was wrong and paid for his mistake with his life.

Egyptian history: Shabaka reigns 728-712 B.C. Shebitku reigns over Egypt 712-698 B.C. while Tirharka reigns over Ethiopia 712-698 B.C. (2 Kings 19:9) Tirharka then reigns over both Egypt and Ethiopia 698-672 B.C. Necho I 672-664 B.C. Psamtik I 664-610 B.C. Necho II 610-595 B.C. Necho II had slain Judah's king Josiah 639-608 B.C. in 608 B.C. (2 Kings 23:29)

Ancient Egyptian History from Biblical Shishak to Biblical Necho II with no missing links! The Jewish scribes produced the correct chronology in which gives new light to the history of the Libyan pharoah's reigns over ancient Egypt.

As we are reviewing the the Holy Scriptures support in world history, the Moslem terrorists keep destroying the world's cultural monuments and Jewish artifacts on the Temple Mount. As long as the internet remains open we can communicate these truths the mass media simply ignores. It must be a hard life for the Israelis having to put up with the media's pro-Palestinian slant on every issue.

Submitting....

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