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Predicting Iraq's Future

Reader comment on item: Predicting Iraq's Bleak Future

Submitted by firozali A. Mulla (Tanzania), Jul 20, 2009 at 01:15

Predicting Iraq's Future. The only future any one can predict in any country is when we have cash to pump in and nothing to pump out for sometime. We are in a dilemma of global recession that we never assumed would land on the Iraq, UK, USA or any state that for the sake of vengeance went to Iraq. I say vengeance as Bush had a tough time with Saddam when Saddam took Kuwait. The end was no property, the oil that was "our" came out as the very false presumption. No oil came from the complete Middle East. That took many oil seekers by surprise. That was another shock. Then the mortgages, unemployment, shortages of men in Afghanistan and Iraq did nothing to ease the UK. In fact, UK cannot balance the books of sending 2000 and 700. There are problems in the Brow's cabinets.

Obama is weak by weeks.

President Barack Obama made his personal icy cool the trademark of his campaign, the tenor of his White House and the hallmark of an early run of successes at home and abroad. But as the glamour wears off and a long, frustrating summer wears on, he is being forced to improvise — stooping to respond to political foes and adjusting his tactics and demeanor for the trench warfare of a legislative agenda.

The root of the change is one that faces every president: Economic and international realities that resist political charm. Iran and North Korea have shown no interest in the president's outstretched hand. The economy has delivered a double-whammy, with rising unemployment stirring voters' concerns while sluggish growth deprives the government of tax revenues Obama would like to spend on new programs. We are now looking at unemployment numbers that undermine any confidence that we might be nearing the bottom of the recession. The appropriate metaphor is not the green shoots of new growth. A better image is to look at the true total of jobless people as a prudent navigator looks at an iceberg.

Fifteen states have crossed a painful threshold: 10 percent unemployment. More states, and the nation, likely will follow, one of the biggest dangers to an economic recovery.

How consumers behave in the face of rising unemployment will figure prominently in shaping a broader rebound. If they go back into hibernation and sharply cut spending like they did at the end of last year, the recovery could cave in. More likely is that consumers will stay cautious, making for a fragile and slow-moving national economic turnaround, economists said.

A man was spreading the black powder in the Oxford circus. The men saw this and asked, "What is that for". He said, "To keep Osama far". "But he is miles from here". "Works does it works does it not?"

I thank you

Firozali A. Mulla

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