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Plato "as usual rocket fired without fuel"

Reader comment on item: Britain's Encounter with Islamic Law
in response to reader comment: Bilawal: Astonishing kindergarten mathematical miracle!

Submitted by Mansoor (Pakistan), Apr 4, 2008 at 15:54

Plato you have great art of twisting the original question and throw the topic in no man's land.

Rather than accepting the signs Bilawal most sincerely posted you started discussion about Pakistan...so irrelevant and sheer waste of time. Muslims are achieving much and are progressing shoulder to shoulder with other nations in every field. Our Prophet said " Get knowledge even if you have to go to China" you know Prophet never prohibited any Muslim to cross boundaries to learn and get knowledge.

I admire great achievements by the West in the field of science and technology and it is no harm and no shame if Pakistan or any other Muslim country sends their youth or spend huge funds to take benefits of advanced technology. Many times you discussed about Muslim achievement in Science....but you forget that if you just minus one achievement of Algebra by a Muslim Al-Khwarizmi the whole structure of science will fall apart. I know you would shout like a donkey and throw your foolish claims but better read the following link which has ample source (non Islamic) to endorse the contribution so valuable.

http://www.ms.uky.edu/~carl/ma330/project2/al-khwa21.html

"Excerpts"

It was at the House of Wisdom that al-Khwarizmi wrote his treatise al-Kitab al-mukhtasar fi hisab al-jabr wa'l-muqabala or "The Compendious Book on Calculation By Completion and Balancing" that was written in 830 B.C.. It dealt with "what is easiest and most useful" (ernie.bgsu.edu). Conceived as an elementary textbook of practical mathematics, the Al-jabr wa'l-muqabala began with a discussion of the algebra of first and second degree equations and moved on in its final two parts to the business of practical applications to questions on mensuration and legacies. This was the most important book al-Khwarizmi was known for.

Al-jabr

From his most important book, Al-jabr wa'l muqabalah , comes the word algebra. The word al-jabr presumably meant something like "restoration" or "completion" and seems to refer to the transposition of subtracted terms to the other side of an equation; the word muqabalah is said to refer to "reduction" or "balancing"--that is, the cancellation of like terms on opposite sides of the equations or the simplification of the resulting expression (Boyer,228).

Diophantus is sometimes called "the father of Algebra," but this title more appropriately belongs to al-Khwarizmi. Al-Khwarizmi's work is on a more elementary and rhetorical level than that of Diophantus. Also, Arab scholars did not make any use of syncopation or of negative numbers. Al-jabr comes closer to elementary algebra of today than the works of either Diophantus or Brahmagupta, because the book is not concerned with difficult problems in indeterminant analysis but with a straight forward and elementary exposition of the solution of equations, especially that of second degree (Boyer, 228).

The Arabs loved good clear arguments from beginning to end as well as systematic organizations (which Diophantus of the Hindus excelled). The Arabs were more practical-minded and down-to-earth in their approach to mathematics (Boyer, 227-232).


It is very difficult to digest solid facts encountering everyday. You have now focussed to find ways to insult Muslims and Islam in particular but you are failed to understand that it is the most impossible thing you are attempting continuously.

Better try some other gun...


Submitting....

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