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Let the British suffer, they asked for it.

Reader comment on item: Britain's Encounter with Islamic Law
in response to reader comment: The British should suffer??

Submitted by john coughlan (United Kingdom), Mar 8, 2008 at 06:56

Mr Riley,Thank you for the history lesson.

Although as you say the "Normans "were more or less invited into Ireland in order to help Dermot McMurragh, King of Leinster, king regain Ireland.The modern term"the British"includes those of Norman bloodlines.Its obvious from history Sir that the Modern term "British",starved and enslaved the populations of not only Ireland but Scotland and wales also.This continued though out the ages.

With campaigns by Edward I (17 June 1239 – 7 July 1307) and of course The Cromwellian conquest of Ireland (1649-53).
I also submit evidence for the term"the British" http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/British_English
(copy and paste into your browser).also please read http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Hunger

Catholic emancipation(despite cromwell!) had been achieved in 1829, and Catholics made up 80 percent of the population, the bulk of which lived in conditions of poverty and insecurity. At the top of the "social pyramid" was the "ascendancy class," the English and Anglo Irish families who owned most of the land, and who had more or less limitless power over their tenants. Some of their estates were vast: the Earl of Lucan for example, owned over 60,000 acres (240 kmĀ²). Many of these landlords lived in England and were called "absentee landlords". They used agents to administer their property for them, with the revenue generated being sent to England. A number of the absentee landlords living in England never set foot in Ireland. They took their rents from their "impoverished tenants" or paid them minimal wages to raise crops and livestock for export.

Also please read Great Irish Famine may also refer to as The great Irish famine of 1740-1741.

Cecil Woodham-Smith, an authority on the Irish Famine, wrote in The Great Hunger; Ireland 1845-1849 that,

" ...no issue has provoked so much anger or so embittered relations between the two countries (England and Ireland) as the indisputable fact that huge quantities of food were exported from Ireland to England throughout the period when the people of Ireland were dying of starvation.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Great_Hunger

I rest my case Sir!.....

Submitting....

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